Resources

California English Learner Roadmap:  

Strengthening Comprehensive Educational Policies, Programs, and Practices for English Learners

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California Department of Education Resources

CA English Learner Roadmap Policy in Mandarin pdf

CA English Learner Roadmap Policy in Spanish docx

CA English Learner Roadmap Policy in Vietnamese pdf

CA EL Roadmap Printable Document in English docx

CA EL Roadmap Printable Document in Spanish docx

CA English Learner Roadmap at A Glance: Information Sheet

English Learner Self-Reflection Rubric docx 
This Self-Reflection Rubric can be used to evaluate practices at schools, districts, and county offices of education from preschool through higher education. Please use this rubric prior to submitting a practice to the EL Roadmap Example Survey.

CDE CA English Learner Roadmap Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
FAQs that answer questions regarding the English Learner Roadmap: Strengthening Comprehensive Educational Policies, Programs, and Practices for English Learners (CA EL Roadmap). These questions are updated as new information and resources on the CA EL Roadmap become available.

Teacher Toolkits

Californians Together CA EL Roadmap Toolkits
This web page contains links to toolkits for teachers to assist them to implement the CA EL Roadmap principles in their classrooms. These toolkits, written by Dr. Laurie Olsen and Martha Hernandez, are free to download. Toolkits will be available for the following grade spans: preschool, elementary school, middle school, and high school.

Teacher Toolkits - Frequently Asked Questions


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Elementary School Teacher Toolkit

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Middle School Teacher Toolkit

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High School Teacher Toolkit

Videos

CA EL Roadmap Webinar (Video; 22:36)
This webinar provides an overview of the EL Roadmap Policy and the CA EL Roadmap, including their development and context. It also explores the connection between the CA EL Roadmap and the Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) and discusses the resources available to local educational agencies (LEAs) seeking to implement the policy.

California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE) EL Roadmap Policy Introduction and Overview (Video; 3:25)
This video, created by CABE, provides an introduction and orientation to the EL Roadmap Policy approved in July 2017 by the California State Board of Education (SBE). This is the first of a three part series narrated by Dr. Laurie Olsen, co-chair of the EL Roadmap Workgroup. The EL Roadmap Workgroup was convened by Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson and members of the California Department of Education and was co-chaired by Dr. Kenji Hakuta.

California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE) EL Roadmap Policy Introduction and Overview (Video; 3:25)
This video, created by CABE, provides an introduction and orientation to the EL Roadmap Policy approved in July 2017 by the California State Board of Education (SBE). This is the first of a three part series narrated by Dr. Laurie Olsen, co-chair of the EL Roadmap Workgroup. The EL Roadmap Workgroup was convened by the previous Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tom Torlakson, and members of the California Department of Education and was co-chaired by Dr. Kenji Hakuta.

CABE EL Roadmap Policy Four Principles (Video; 4:47)
This video, created by CABE, provides an overview of the vision, mission, and four key principles of the EL Roadmap Policy approved in July 2017 by the SBE. This is the second of a three part series narrated by Dr. Laurie Olsen, co-chair of the EL Roadmap Workgroup. The EL Roadmap Workgroup was convened by the previous Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tom Torlakson, and members of the California Department of Education and was co-chaired by Dr. Kenji Hakuta.

CABE EL Roadmap Call to Action (Video; 4:20)
This video, created by CABE, provides an overview of the action steps districts and schools can take in support of English Learners and multilingualism, as described in the CA EL Roadmap. This is the third of a three part series narrated by Dr. Laurie Olsen, co-chair of the EL Roadmap Workgroup. The EL Roadmap Workgroup was convened by the previous Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tom Torlakson, and members of the California Department of Education and was co-chaired by Dr. Kenji Hakuta.

CA EL Roadmap (Video; 3:15)
This video, created by the Anaheim Union High School District, includes students discussing the importance of the CA EL Roadmap.

Presentations for Professional Learning

The presentations below are available for use by LEAs for professional learning and training on the CA EL Roadmap. The presentations are designed for different audiences and can be adjusted to fit the timeframe available. Please choose the presentation that best suits your audience.

Parent Presentation

CA EL Roadmap Presentation for Parents (PPTX)
A presentation and talking points on the CA EL Roadmap and its connection to the LCAP for public use. This presentation can be used to inform parents and parent groups about the EL Roadmap Policy and engage them in the implementation plan. Timeframe: 1 hour and 45 minutes (can be extended or shortened to fit your timeframe)

Teacher Presentation

CA EL Roadmap Teacher Presentation (PPTX)
A presentation and talking points on the CA EL Roadmap and its implementation for public use. This presentation can be used to inform teachers about the EL Roadmap Policy and engage them in the implementation plan. This presentation includes opportunities for teachers to self-assess and reflect on current implementation at the classroom, site, and district levels and plan for next steps.Timeframe: 2 hours and 45 minutes (can be extended or shortened to fit your timeframe)

School, District, and County Leadership Presentation

CA EL Roadmap Presentation for School, District, and County Leadership (PPTX)
A presentation and talking points on the CA EL Roadmap and its connection to the LCAP for public use. This presentation can be used to inform school, district, and county leadership about the EL Roadmap Policy and engage them in the implementation process. This presentation includes opportunities for leadership to self-assess and reflect on current implementation at the site, district, and county levels and to plan for next steps. Timeframe: 2 hours and 30 minutes (can be extended or shortened to fit your timeframe)

Resources

Model resolution that is inclusive of Early Childhood Education

Allison Briceño, answers the important question: What does the English Learner Roadmap mean for teachers?

CSBA Brief: What is the California English Learner Roadmap?

Masking the Focus on English Learners: The Consequences of California’s Accountability System’s Dashboard on Year 4 Local Control and Accountability Plans (LCAPs)

Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) Resources 

Does Your Local Control Accountability Plan ( LCAP) Deliver on the Promise of Increased or Improved Services to English Learners?: 10 Research-aligned Rubrics to Help Answer the Question and Guide your Program  -  English (Californians Together)


¿Cumple Su Plan De Control Y Rendimiento De Cuentas (LCAP) Con La Promesa De Aumentar O Mejorar Los Servicios Para Los Aprendices De Ingles? 10 RuÚBRICAS BASADAS EN INVESTIGACIÓN PAR A RESPONDER A ES TA PREGUN TA Y GUIAR SU PROGRAMA - Spanish (Californians Together)


Masking the Focus on English Learners: The Consequences of California’s Accountability System’s Dashboard on Year 4 Local Control and Accountability Plans (LCAPs) (Californians Together)


A Review of Year 2 LCAPs: A Weak Response to English Learners (Californians Together)


ELL Master Plan Exemplars

Fullerton Unified School District EL Master Plan

Hayward Unified School District EL Master Plan

Los Angeles Unified School District EL Master Plan

Oxnard Unified School District EL Master Plan

Oakland Unified School District EL Master Plan


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Principle 1: Assets-Oriented and Needs Responsive Schools

  • Illustrative Example: An Educator’s Guide to the “Four Cs”. Preparing 21st Century Students for a Global Society

    The National Education Association (NEA) developed this guide to introduce educators to the concept, stress the importance of the “Four Cs,” and put 21st century education into classroom practice. The guide includes ideas and resources that will help advance the “Four Cs” in classroom practices. These resources include practical techniques to integrate the “Four Cs” in the classroom setting; tools for developing better proficiency in technology; and methods to ensure that students are learning in a meaningful context. It also offers suggestions for encouraging your department, school, district, and state to embrace the “Four Cs.”

  • Illustrative Example: Beyond Differences

    The mission of Beyond Differences is to inspire students at all middle schools nationwide to end social isolation and create a culture of belonging for everyone. Includes three components: *Know Your Classmates is designed to explore middle school youth’s identity and belonging, understand traditions, and recognize stereotypes. Multi-cultural and multi-faith backgrounds are common in today’s schools and Know Your Classmates is speaking honestly with children about their feelings and experiences with one another. *No One Eats Alone™ teaches everyone how to make friends at lunch, often the most difficult part of the school day. Created and organized by students, this is our most popular program where schools in all 50 United States participate! *Be Kind Online is a powerful engagement program for middle school youth, their teachers and families. Focused on creating inclusive communities online, particularly learning to respond to digital gossip to reduce social isolation. All programs encourage taking the pledge to never exclude others, reaching out to someone new, and spreading the word that inclusion is cool!

  • Illustrative Example: California Department of Education Second Step

    The Second Step Middle School Program is web-based, and responsive to the needs of adolescents. For each grade, the program includes a year of weekly 25 minute lessons that address the four key areas of Social Emotional Learning (SEL): Mindsets and Goals, Values and Friendships, Thoughts, Emotions and Decisions and Serious Peer Conflicts. Included in the program are advisory activities, program training, professional learning, and additional resources—such as lesson plans to extend SEL throughout the day, SEL rubrics and videos. Program is intended to create a sense of safety and respect grounded in the social-emotional health and well-being of the entire school community.

  • Illustrative Example: Capturing Kids' Hearts

    This program, by the Flippen Group, is a multi-year, system-wide approach that helps build a positive school culture that is relational and tends to the social-emotional needs of students and educators. The focus is on strengthening students’ connectedness to others through enhancing healthy bonds with their teachers and establishing collaborative agreements of acceptable behavior. District and campus leadership models desired behaviors and holds their teams accountable for living out transformational behaviors and processes. *All campus educators establish collaborative agreements of behavior in every classroom. *Mentors support and encourage teammates in using the learned skills and processes. *Every faculty member participates in ongoing professional development and must be committed to utilizing the processes and techniques until breakthrough occurs.

  • Illustrative Example: Center for Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning (CCRTL)

    The Center for Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning (CCRTL) exists for making cultural responsiveness a meaningful aspect of everyday life. Being culturally responsive is an approach that practices the validation and affirmation of different cultures for the purposes of moving beyond race and moving below the superficial focus on culture. The number one objective is to sway school communities, professional communities, and the general public to becoming culturally responsive through three broad strands of development: professional development, community development, and school development. With these three strands, the goal is to influence institutional policies and practices, and inspire changes in behaviors – individually and institutionally.

  • Illustrative Example: CORE SEL Competencies

    CASEL’s integrated framework promotes intrapersonal, interpersonal, and cognitive competence. There are five core competencies that can be taught in many ways across many settings. Many educators and researchers are also exploring how best to assess these competencies. The five core competencies are: self-awareness, self-management, responsible decision-making, relationship skills, social awareness. Social awareness is focused on the ability to take the perspective of and empathize with others, including those from diverse backgrounds and cultures. Relationship skills address communication, social engagement relationship-building and teamwork.

  • Illustrative Example: Culturally Responsive/Relevant Teaching and Learning Resources

    Compiled by the Hayward Unified School District, this website lists numerous resources, including bibliographies of culturally relevant literature for students, to support culturally responsive and relevant teaching and learning.

  • Illustrative Example: Kagan Publishing & Professional Development for Cooperative Learning

    Kagan Publishing and Professional Development offers workshops and products in a number of related topics relating to active student learning including, cooperative learning, brain-friendly instruction, multiple intelligences, differentiated instruction, Win-Win Discipline, and classroom management. Dr. Kagan and his team have developed over 200 Kagan Structures which are used to increase academic achievement, improve ethnic relations, enhance self-esteem, create a more harmonious classroom climate, reduce discipline problems, and develop students’ social skills and character virtues. The central role of Kagan Structures in Kagan’s trainings and publications is the firm commitment to and belief that, student engagement is key.

  • Illustrative Example: Living Justice Press

    Living Justice Press is a nonprofit publisher for restorative justice and peacemaking. The focus is two-fold: first, to promote the understanding and use of peacemaking circles as a means to deal with conflict in many different settings; and second, to publish the voices of those “in struggle” for justice. Living Justice Press, has chosen to publish books that take the restorative justice dialogue to deeper levels by addressing racism, historic harms, and other conflicts between Peoples. LJP publishes the following resource: Circle Forward Building a Restorative School Community (By Carolyn Boyes-Watson and Kay Pranis, 2014), a resource guide designed to help teachers, administrators, students and parents incorporate the practice of Circles into the everyday life of the school community.

  • Illustrative Example: Mindful Schools

    Mindfulness addresses the toxic stress that many students experience on a daily basis. This stress may impair attention, emotion and mood regulation, sleep, and learning readiness. Prolonged exposure to childhood toxic stress has lifelong impacts on mental and physical health. Mindful Schools offers educators practical skills for self-care, facilitation, and connecting with youth, providing simple, effective mindfulness practices that can be integrated into the school day and adapted for diverse environments. Resources include starter lessons, presentations, guided practices, videos, mindful schools articles, and reading lists.

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Principle 2: Intellectual Quality of Instruction and Meaningful Access

  • Illustrative Example: AVID—Advancement Via Individual Determination

    AVID equips teachers and schools with what they need to help students who often will be the first in their families to attend college and are from groups traditionally underrepresented in higher education succeed on a path to college and career success. AVID offers a variety of classroom activities, lesson plans, professional learning videos, and articles that are relevant to students. AVID’s professional learning focuses on Culturally Relevant Teaching, Academic Language and Literacy, and Digital Teaching and Learning. A major component of the program is a one period elective class where students receive the additional academic, social, and emotional support they need to succeed in rigorous courses. AVID Excel With AVID Excel, middle schools can address the needs of Long Term English Learners by accelerating language acquisition, developing academic literacy, and placing them on a path to high school AVID and college-preparatory coursework. The elective provides explicit instruction in English language development and academic language through reading, writing, oral language, academic vocabulary, and college readiness skills. AVID Excel can also be implemented to ensure that heritage language courses support full biliteracy, increase academic rigor, and provide a path to Advanced Placement language classes for EL students.

  • Illustrative Example: Be GLAD®

    Be GLAD®, is a national organization providing professional development on the Guided Language Acquisition Design model to states, districts, and schools promoting language acquisition, high academic achievement, and 21st century skills. Teachers are trained to modify the delivery of student instruction to promote academic language and literacy. The professional development offered focuses on improved pedagogy with consistent instructional routines while creating a school environment responsive to diversity with an inclusive learning environment. Be GLAD® helps to establish a project-based, student-centered curriculum process that is inquiry driven.

  • Illustrative Example: English Language Arts/English Language Development Framework for California Public Schools: Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve 2014

    The 2014 ELA/ELD Framework, from the California Department of Education, supports and incorporate the California Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (CA CCSS for ELA/Literacy) and the California English Language Development Standards (CA ELD Standards). Classroom teachers of all grades and disciplines will find descriptions of grade-level ELA/literacy and ELD instruction across the content areas and examples of engaging teaching and assessment practices for ensuring the progress of the diverse students they serve. Language integrated in and through content is a major theme of the ELA/ELD Framework. The Framework serves as a key resource for the implementation of the EL Roadmap, Principle 2.

  • Illustrative Example: History/Social Science Framework for California, Kindergarten through Grade Twelve, 2016

    The 2016 History/Social Science Framework, from the California Department of Education, describes grade-level content, areas of focus, and examples of engaging classroom activities and assessments practices that meet the needs of the diverse students they serve The framework offers guidance for educators as they design, implement, and maintain a course of study to teach content, develop inquiry-based critical thinking skills, improve reading comprehension and expository writing ability, and promote an engaged and knowledgeable citizenry in history/social sciences. The HSS Framework also supports interdisciplinary instruction and implementation of the California Common Core State Standards, the California English Language Development Standards (and the English Language Arts/English Language Development Framework.

  • Illustrative Example: Integrating the CA ELD Standards into K–12 Mathematics and Science Teaching and Learning

    From WestEd.org--A Supplementary Resource for Educators Implementing in tandem the California English Language Development Standards, the California Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, and the Next Generation Science Standards for California Public Schools.

  • Illustrative Example: Project GLAD®

    As a model of professional learning, the Orange County Department of Education National Training Center (NTC) for the Project GLAD® (Guided Language Acquisition Design) model, is dedicated to building academic language and literacy for all students, especially English Learner/emergent bilingual students. The model enhances teachers’ design and delivery of standards-based instruction through an integrated approach with the intent of building language proficiency and academic comprehension. Project GLAD® classrooms promote an environment that respects and honors each child’s voice, personal life experience, beliefs and values their culture.

  • Illustrative Example: Sobrato Early Academic Language Model

    This example, from the Sobrato Family Foundation, demonstrates Principle 1, Elements 1.A, 1.B, 1.C, and 1.D; Principle Two, Elements 2.A, 2.B, 2.C, 2.D, 2.E, and 2.G; and Principle Four, Element 4.A, in action.

  • Illustrative Example: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project

    The Teachers College Reading and Writing Project (TCRWP) was founded and is directed by Lucy Calkins. The organization has developed state-of-the-art tools and methods as well as professional development for teaching reading and writing, for using performance assessments and learning progressions to accelerate progress, and for literacy-rich content-area instruction. Lucy Calkins’ 5-part reading and writing workshop framework offers a combination of whole-class, small-group, one-on-one instruction, and independent practice. The TCRWP has many free resources for teachers, coaches and administrators. They offer videos that provide an orientation to the Units of Study series for reading and writing as well as videos that show students and teachers at work in classrooms. There are documents to support the assessment of student growth, resources for implementation of reading and writing workshops and links to professional texts written by TCRWP staff. They have a FAQ available on their website.

  • Illustrative Example: Thinking Maps

    Thinking Maps are consistent visual patterns linked directly to eight specific thought processes. Through visualization, concrete images of abstract thought are created. Students use visual patterns to work collaboratively for deeper comprehension in all content areas. They use the maps to analyze complex texts and think mathematically for conceptual understanding and problem solving. Thinking maps allow teachers to see the evidence of their students thinking and learning. In a school-wide implementation, Thinking Maps help establish a common language for learning and are particularly powerful for English Learners for whom the visual scaffolding makes content more comprehensible and can be used consistently across language settings in bilingual and dual language programs.

  • CA EL Roadmap Presentation for Parents

    A presentation and talking points on the CA EL Roadmap and its connection to the LCAP for public use. This presentation, created by the California Department of Education's English Learner Support Division, can be used to inform parents and parent groups about the EL Roadmap Policy and engage them in the implementation plan.

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Principle 3: System Conditions that Support Effectiveness

  • Illustrative Example: Improving Post-Secondary Opportunities by Addressing System Inequity

    This example, from the Fresno Unified School District, demonstrates Principle Three, Elements 3.A and 3.D, and Principle Four, Element 4.A, in action.

  • Illustrative Example: My Name, My Identity

    This example, from the Santa Clara County Office of Education, demonstrates Principle 1, Elements 1.A, 1.C, and 1.D and Principle Three, Element 3.A, in action.

  • CABE EL Roadmap Call to Action Video

    This video, created by CABE, provides an overview of the action steps districts and schools can take in support of English Learners and multilingualism, as described in the CA EL Roadmap. This is the third of a three part series narrated by Dr. Laurie Olsen, co-chair of the EL Roadmap Workgroup. The EL Roadmap Workgroup was convened by the previous Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tom Torlakson, and members of the California Department of Education and was co-chaired by Dr. Kenji Hakuta.

  • California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE) EL Roadmap Policy Introduction and Overview Video

    This video, created by CABE, provides an introduction and orientation to the EL Roadmap Policy approved in July 2017 by the California State Board of Education (SBE). This is the first of a three part series narrated by Dr. Laurie Olsen, co-chair of the EL Roadmap Workgroup. The EL Roadmap Workgroup was convened by Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson and members of the California Department of Education and was co-chaired by Dr. Kenji Hakuta.

  • Californians Together CA EL Roadmap Teacher Toolkits

    This web page, created by Californians Together, contains links to toolkits for teachers to assist them to implement the CA EL Roadmap principles in their classrooms. These toolkits, written by Dr. Laurie Olsen and Martha Hernandez, are free to download. Toolkits will be available for the following grade spans: preschool, elementary school, middle school, and high school.

Principle 4: Alignment and Articulation Within and Across Systems

  • CA EL Roadmap Presentation for Parents

    A presentation and talking points on the CA EL Roadmap and its connection to the LCAP for public use. This presentation, created by the California Department of Education's English Learner Support Division, can be used to inform parents and parent groups about the EL Roadmap Policy and engage them in the implementation plan.

  • CA EL Roadmap Presentation for School, District, and County Leadership

    A presentation and talking points on the CA EL Roadmap and its connection to the LCAP for public use. This presentation can be used to inform school, district, and county leadership about the EL Roadmap Policy and engage them in the implementation process. This presentation, created by the California Department of Education's English Learner Support Division, includes opportunities for leadership to self-assess and reflect on current implementation at the site, district, and county levels and to plan for next steps.

  • CA EL Roadmap Teacher Presentation

    A presentation and talking points on the CA EL Roadmap and its implementation for public use. This presentation can be used to inform teachers about the EL Roadmap Policy and engage them in the implementation plan. This presentation, created by the California Department of Education's English Learner Support Division, includes opportunities for teachers to self-assess and reflect on current implementation at the classroom, site, and district levels and plan for next steps.

  • CA EL Roadmap Video

    This video, created by the Anaheim Union High School District, includes students discussing the importance of the CA EL Roadmap.

  • CA EL Roadmap Webinar

    This webinar, created by the California Department of Education, provides an overview of the EL Roadmap Policy and the CA EL Roadmap, including their development and context. It also explores the connection between the CA EL Roadmap and the Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) and discusses the resources available to local educational agencies (LEAs) seeking to implement the policy.

  • CABE EL Roadmap Call to Action Video

    This video, created by CABE, provides an overview of the action steps districts and schools can take in support of English Learners and multilingualism, as described in the CA EL Roadmap. This is the third of a three part series narrated by Dr. Laurie Olsen, co-chair of the EL Roadmap Workgroup. The EL Roadmap Workgroup was convened by the previous Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tom Torlakson, and members of the California Department of Education and was co-chaired by Dr. Kenji Hakuta.

  • CABE EL Roadmap Policy Four Principles Video

    This video, created by CABE, provides an overview of the vision, mission, and four key principles of the EL Roadmap Policy approved in July 2017 by the SBE. This is the second of a three part series narrated by Dr. Laurie Olsen, co-chair of the EL Roadmap Workgroup. The EL Roadmap Workgroup was convened by the previous Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tom Torlakson, and members of the California Department of Education and was co-chaired by Dr. Kenji Hakuta.

  • California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE) EL Roadmap Policy Introduction and Overview Video

    This video, created by CABE, provides an introduction and orientation to the EL Roadmap Policy approved in July 2017 by the California State Board of Education (SBE). This is the first of a three part series narrated by Dr. Laurie Olsen, co-chair of the EL Roadmap Workgroup. The EL Roadmap Workgroup was convened by Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson and members of the California Department of Education and was co-chaired by Dr. Kenji Hakuta.

  • Californians Together CA EL Roadmap Toolkits

    This web page, created by Californians Together, contains links to toolkits for teachers to assist them to implement the CA EL Roadmap principles in their classrooms. These toolkits, written by Dr. Laurie Olsen and Martha Hernandez, are free to download. Toolkits will be available for the following grade spans: preschool, elementary school, middle school, and high school.